Lawyers For People Who Suffer Paralysis In An Accident

Everyone relies on the proper functioning of his or her body to go about his or her daily life, but the proper functioning of your body is exactly what an injury accident can potentially take away. Paralysis is the name for a condition in which a person loses muscle function in some part of the body. Loss of muscle function is caused by a problem with communication between the brain and the affected muscles and without this communication, a person's life can become permanently altered. If you or someone you love has suffered paralysis in an accident, the attorneys at Maples, Nix & Diesselhorst are here to help you.

Causes Of Paralysis

Paralysis may have one or more causes. In a spinal cord injury, for instance, the partial or total severing of the spinal cord may result in paralysis below the place where the spinal cord was injured, because messages from the brain can no longer travel past the injury site. Damage to nerves outside the spinal column may cause paralysis in smaller areas of the body, because the damage prevents messages from going to and from the brain. Some diseases also cause paralysis by disrupting communications between the brain and certain body parts, limbs, or organs.

Common types of accidents and events that may result in paralysis include:

  • Vehicle accidents. Accidents in cars, motorcycles, buses and other vehicles are a leading cause of both traumatic brain injury (TBI) and spinal cord injury (SCI), both of which can result in partial or total paralysis.
  • Falls. Any fall that damages the spinal cord or other nerves can cause paralysis in some area of the body.
  • Burn injuries. A severe burn that destroys nerve endings may cause paralysis and/or loss of feeling in the area affected by the destroyed nerves.
  • Stroke or other medical accidents. Strokes are a common cause of paralysis. While not all strokes can be predicted or prevented, there are ways to reduce stroke risks.
  • Birth-related injuries. Cerebral palsy, Bell's palsy, and shoulder dystocia may all cause temporary or permanent paralysis. The risk of these conditions may increase in childbirth if certain other known factors are present.
  • Chronic diseases. Multiple sclerosis (MS), Guillain-Barre syndrome, and other chronic or terminal conditions are known to cause paralysis as they progress. When evaluating a patient who has one of these conditions and who has suffered an accident, care should be taken to separate paralysis caused by an accident-related injury from paralysis caused by the disease.

Effects Of Paralysis

Paralysis can affect a body area of any size. It might affect one muscle or a group of muscles. Paralysis can occur on one side of the body or both sides, and can occur both above and below the waist. The higher the spinal cord injury, the more parts of the body will be affected. The injured person may lose the sense of touch below the area of injury, or the sense of touch may remain while motor function is lost. Paraplegia general means both legs are affected. In quadriplegia, the victim may lose movement and feeling in all four limbs.

The type, severity and area of paralysis experienced are slightly different for each person. It depends on which nerves are damaged, how they are damaged and how bad the damage is. Therefore, treatment of paralysis is tailored for each individual patient's symptoms, taking into account the causes of paralysis and any other injuries or illnesses the person has.

Providing The Support You Need

Paralysis can be a frightening experience, and adjusting to your new health condition always takes time. At Maples, Nix & Diesselhorst in Oklahoma City, our lawyers can help you get the compensation you need, so you can focus on rebuilding your life. Contact us today using our online form for a free consultation. If you are from Oklahoma City, you can also call 800-539-0652.